Monkeying Around

If one were to step back for a moment and honestly look at this current monkeypox craze, one would see that the story that is being sold doesn’t quite add up. As there is a plethora of conflicting and contradictory evidence being presented about this “viral” outbreak in such a quick and shortened timeframe, it can get pretty confusing and frustrating trying to make any sense out of the propaganda being thrown about by the media like empty banana peels just waiting to be slipped on by the unsuspecting passerby. Thus, it seems like the perfect time to examine the claims to see what we can uncover.

Rapid Spread in Non-Endemic Areas?

If we were to follow the germ theory narrative, infectious diseases don’t just crop up over various parts of the world all at the same time. The outbreak would occur gradually, usually in one country considered the “hotspot” and then spread slowly to the surrounding areas. This transfer of infection would occur person-to-person after someone had become infected where the disease was endemic, i.e. where it is regularly found amongst the people.

Non-endemic cases reported beginning May 13th through May 21st, 2022.

However, the monkeypox outbreak is somehow bucking this trend. According to the WHO:

“Reported cases thus far have no established travel links to an endemic area. Based on currently available information, cases have mainly but not exclusively been identified amongst men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking care in primary care and sexual health clinics.”

“The identification of confirmed and suspected cases of monkeypox with no direct travel links to an endemic area represents a highly unusual event. Surveillance to date in non-endemic areas has been limited, but is now expanding. WHO expects that more cases in non-endemic areas will be reported.”

https://www.who.int/emergencies/disease-outbreak-news/item/2022-DON385

We can see that this outbreak is unusual in that it is rapidly occurring among people (mostly gay men) in non-endemic countries who have no history of travel to the areas where monkeypox is said to occur. That statement right there should sound the alarm and raise the red flags for everyone. Monkeypox is supposed to be a “virus” that is not highly contagious and one that is difficult to transmit. According to a recent article in the Boston Globe:

Monkeypox is not highly contagious, scientists say. So why is it suddenly in nine countries?

Are the cases related?

“Some appear to be, but scientists have so far been unable to establish common links across so many countries and are still trying to understand how these cases may or may not be related. “The geographic dispersion of this is quite rare,” Bausch said.

Another puzzling aspect of this outbreak is how fast the cases and symptoms have been popping up, leading some to wonder if this is a new strain of monkeypox with a shorter incubation period.

“Either something is fundamentally different here, or there are more to these cases than we understand,” said Dr. Meghan May, professor of infectious disease at the University of New England College of Medicine in Maine.

Is monkeypox a sexually transmitted disease?

“The virus has not typically been known to spread through sexual contact. But many of the confirmed and suspected cases across several of the countries are among men aged 20 to 55 who report having sex with other men. And many of the reports have come from health facilities that provide care for patients with sexually transmitted diseases.”

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/05/19/metro/monkeypox-is-not-highly-contagious-scientists-say-so-why-is-it-suddenly-nine-countries/

The media wants us to believe that we have unrelated monkeypox cases occurring in non-endemic countries breaking out almost exclusively amongst gay men who were being seen for STD’s and are being diagnosed with a “virus” that is not highly contagious which is not known to spread through sexual activity. That is quite the giant pill of BS to swallow. It is especially difficult to swallow when viewing how suspected and confirmed monkeypox cases are defined. Again, according to the WHO:

Suspected case:

“A person of any age presenting in a monkeypox non-endemic country[2] with an unexplained acute rash

AND                                        

One or more of the following signs or symptoms, since 15 March 2022:

  • Headache
  • Acute onset of fever (>38.5°C)
  • Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes)
  • Myalgia (muscle and body aches)
  • Back pain
  • Asthenia (profound weakness)

AND

for which the following common causes of acute rash do not explain the clinical picture: varicella zoster, herpes zoster, measles, Zika, dengue, chikungunya, herpes simplex, bacterial skin infections, disseminated gonococcus infection, primary or secondary syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale, molluscum contagiosum, allergic reaction (e.g., to plants); and any other locally relevant common causes of papular or vesicular rash.

N.B. It is not necessary to obtain negative laboratory results for listed common causes of rash illness in order to classify a case as suspected.

Confirmed case:

“A case meeting the definition of either a suspected or probable case and is laboratory confirmed for monkeypox virus by detection of unique sequences of viral DNA either by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or sequencing.”

“Endemic monkeypox disease is normally geographically limited to West and Central Africa. The identification of confirmed and suspected cases of monkeypox without any travel history to an endemic area in multiple countries is atypical, hence, there is an urgent need to raise awareness about monkeypox and undertake comprehensive case finding and isolation (provided with supportive care), contact tracing and supportive care to limit further onward transmission.”

https://www.who.int/emergencies/disease-outbreak-news/item/2022-DON385

As can be seen, all that is needed to become a suspected case of monkeypox is having an acute rash in a non-endemic country along with symptoms typically associated with monkeypox. However, this obviously creates a bit of a problem as the same symptoms seen in monkeypox are common in many diseases. It is also claimed that the monkeypox cases are atypical, which means that the symptoms are irregular and/or unusual:

“With the exception of cases sporadically reported in travellers from endemic countries, cases in non- endemic areas that are not linked to travel from endemic countries are not typical. At the present time (as of May 2022) there is no clear link between the cases reported and travel from endemic countries and no link with infected animals.”

https://www.who.int/news-room/questions-and-answers/item/monkeypox?gclid=Cj0KCQjw-daUBhCIARIsALbkjSY864Xt7H41zoMYS-Qo03v0h-_abj9t7o1FXNwss9gHQ3swJemHfcQaAmMZEALw_wcB

The symptoms could be relatively mild (such as one pox on the genital area), lack regular symptoms altogether (no fever, no rash), or they can mimic or present as any of the other various skin eruptive diseases (as is occuring right now as the symptoms are being confused with STD’s). The WHO readily admits that monkeypox lesions can not be easily distinguished from among the various other diseases that cause skin eruptions:

“Due to the range of conditions that cause skin rashes and because clinical presentation may more often be atypical in this outbreak, it can be challenging to differentiate monkeypox solely based on the clinical presentation, particularly for cases with an atypical presentation. It is therefore important to consider other potential causes of discrete skin lesions or a disseminated rash; Examples of other aetiologies for similar-appearing skin lesions at the different stages of development include herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, molluscum contagiosum virus, enterovirus, measles, scabies, Treponema pallidum (syphilis), bacterial skin infections, medication allergies, parapoxviruses (causing orf and related conditions) and chancroid (2).”

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://apps.who.int/iris/rest/bitstreams/1425052/retrieve&ved=2ahUKEwjksLa94IX4AhVuZDABHePoAOUQFnoECDAQAQ&usg=AOvVaw09nU9kX5XTjmEDQBvawCjR

Oddly, while they essentially claim that these other causes need to be ruled out, it is not required to do so by way of laboratory testing. Thus, it is up to the interpretation of the attending physician to distinguish between these diseases based on appearance alone, something the WHO admitted is challenging to differentiate especially given the atypical nature of the “outbreak.” Regardless, once a case is suspected, all that is needed in order to jump from a suspected to a confirmed case is a positive PCR test. For obvious reasons, this creates its own set of problems.

Laboratory Confirmation?

First of all, it is stated that the material from the skin lesion is the fluid used to “confirm” a diagnosis. They do, however, allow for the testing of other bodily fluids not from the lesions such as oropharyngeal swabs and urine yet the WHO admits that there is limited data on the accuracy in regards to the testing of these fluids. The WHO leaves it up to the clinical presentation and the location of the lesion in order to determine whether or not the fluids with unknown accuracy should be used for confirmatory testing:

“On 23 May 2022 the WHO issued interim guidance for laboratory testing for the monkeypox virus. Laboratory confirmation of monkeypox relies principally on nucleic acid amplification tests, such as PCR, performed on material from the skin lesion. Testing of other body fluids and tissues, including oropharyngeal swabs, urine, semen, rectal and/or genital swabs, may be indicated based on the clinical presentation and location of the lesions. However, data on the accuracy of testing on these samples is still limited.”

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.news-medical.net/amp/news/20220526/FIND-to-present-an-overview-of-disease-surveillance-status-and-diagnostics-to-combat-monkeypox.aspx

Beyond the issue of using fluids which have unknown accuracy to confirm a case, according to the CDC, there are no commercial assays that can specifically detect the monkeypox “virus:”

“It is recommended that testing for monkeypox be performed in facilities that have recently vaccinated personnel, the necessary equipment, engineering controls, personal protective equipment, and appropriate diagnostic assays available. Diagnostic testing for Orthopoxviruses (which includes monkeypox virus) is available at LRN laboratories located throughout the United States and abroad. There is no commercial assay to detect monkeypox virus.”

https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/lab-personnel/lab-procedures.html

Nothing. 🤷‍♂️

This means that labs across the country looking for monkeypox cases are using tests that look for any “orthopoxvirus,” which is a group comprised of 12 species including smallpox, cowpox, horsepox, camelpox, raccoonpox, skunkpox, monkeypox, and vaccina. Any positive test is assumed to be monkeypox if it occurs in a country where the “virus” is not endemic. As noted before, the cases reported are in non-endemic countries that have no links to endemic areas.

Oddly enough, this lack of specificity, while not an issue for confirming a case by way of PCR, apparently is a problem for antigen and antibody testing. According to the WHO, antigen and antibody tests are useless as they are also not specific for monkeypox:

“Detection of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the preferred laboratory test for monkeypox. The best diagnostic specimens are directly from the rash – skin, fluid or crusts, or biopsy where feasible. Antigen and antibody detection methods may not be useful as they do not distinguish between orthopoxviruses.”

https://www.who.int/health-topics/monkeypox/#tab=tab_1

The CDC has the ultimate deciding voice in whether a case is monkeypox or not. Nothing suspicious about that…

As there are no commercial assays nor antigen/antibody tests specific for monkeypox, after the PCR test comes back positive for all “orthopoxviruses,” the sample is then sent to the very “capable” and “trustworthy” CDC for confirmatory testing as per the smallpox protocols:

“The testing protocols for monkeypox stem from the country’s smallpox preparedness planning. When someone seeks care for a suspicious rash, facilities in what’s called the Laboratory Response Network — a collection of state, local, veterinary, and military labs tapped to test for biological or chemical threats — perform the initial test to see if the cause is an orthopox virus. Samples are also sent to CDC to confirm which type. The system for poxviruses was designed specifically so the CDC would handle any cases of smallpox, McQuiston said. (Smallpox, which once was often lethal, is the only human disease that’s been eradicated, but a small number of labs have stores of the virus that causes it for research purposes.)”

“In this circumstance, an orthopox diagnosis at the LRN is monkeypox until proven otherwise,” said John Brooks, a CDC medical epidemiologist.”

While trusting the CDC, the very organization that needs disease outbreaks in order to stay funded and relevant, to accurately and honestly test to confirm anything should be alarming, there is an even more prominent problem with this scenario. As per the CDC smallpox protocols, PCR can not be used for confirmation of any “virus” when the disease prevalence is low:

“For patients with a high risk of having smallpox, the state health department will contact CDC to conduct laboratory testing to confirm or rule out smallpox. In the absence of known smallpox disease, the predictive value of a positive smallpox test diagnosis is low, so only cases that meet the clinical definition of the disease should be tested.”

https://www.cdc.gov/smallpox/clinicians/diagnosis-evaluation.html

This same issue regarding disease prevalence affecting the accuracy of PCR test results was pointed out by the WHO back in January 2021 regarding “SARS-COV-2:”

“WHO reminds IVD users that disease prevalence alters the predictive value of test results; as disease prevalence decreases, the risk of false positive increases (2). This means that the probability that a person who has a positive result (SARS-CoV-2 detected) is truly infected with SARS-CoV-2 decreases as prevalence decreases, irrespective of the claimed specificity.”

https://www.who.int/news/item/20-01-2021-who-information-notice-for-ivd-users-2020-05

Disease prevalence is the measure of how common a disease is in an at-risk population at a specific time point or period. The CDC measures disease prevalence in this way:

https://www.cdc.gov/csels/dsepd/ss1978/lesson3/section2.html

As monkeypox symptoms naturally mimic and overlap with other diseases causing skin eruptions and the current cases are said to be atypical thus making it even more difficult to differentiate based on symptoms, there is no way to determine a case as monkeypox based on clinical diagnosis alone. This is why it is stated that laboratory testing by PCR is needed for confirmation. However, as the disease prevalence is low in a non-endemic country (granted, as only a few thousand cases occur every year in Africa, it can be argued that prevalence is low in endemic areas as well), the predictive accuracy of PCR is considered low as it generates mostly false-positives. This creates a bit of a conundrum which I wrote about previously. If PCR is needed to figure out how many cases of a disease is present in order to determine prevalence, yet prevalence is needed to be known in order to know whether any PCR result is accurate in order to determine the cases, how can either measure, which depends upon the other to be correct, be accurate?

In Summary:

  • Reported monkeypox cases thus far have no established travel links to an endemic area
  • Cases have mainly but not exclusively been identified amongst men who have sex with men (MSM) seeking care in primary care and sexual health clinics (i.e. suspicion of an STD)
  • The identification of confirmed and suspected cases of monkeypox with no direct travel links to an endemic area represents a highly unusual event
  • WHO expects that more cases in non-endemic areas will be reported
  • Scientists have so far been unable to establish common links across so many countries 
  • “The geographic dispersion of this is quite rare,” Bausch said
  • Another puzzling aspect of this outbreak is how fast the cases and symptoms have been popping up
  • “Either something is fundamentally different here, or there are more to these cases than we understand,” said Dr. Meghan May
  • Even though the majority of the cases are among gay men being treated for STD’s, the “virus” has not typically been known to spread through sexual contact
  • According the to WHO, in order to be a suspected case of monkeypox, a person of any age must present in a monkeypox non-endemic country with an unexplained acute rash with any of the following symptoms:
    1. Headache
    2. Acute onset of fever (>38.5°C)
    3. Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes)
    4. Myalgia (muscle and body aches)
    5. Back pain
    6. Asthenia (profound weakness)
  • The following common causes of acute rash must not explain the clinical picture:
    1. Varicella zoster (Chickenpox)
    2. Herpes zoster (Shingles)
    3. Measles
    4. Zika
    5. Dengue
    6. Chikungunya
    7. Herpes simplex
    8. Bacterial skin infections
    9. Disseminated gonococcus infection
    10. Primary or secondary syphilis
    11. Chancroid
    12. Lymphogranuloma venereum
    13. Granuloma inguinale
    14. Molluscum contagiosum
    15. Allergic reaction (e.g., to plants)
    16. Any other locally relevant common causes of papular or vesicular rash
  • They also state that it is not necessary to obtain negative laboratory results for listed common causes of rash illness in order to classify a case as suspected
  • In other words, while one must rule out these common skin eruptions that are regularly confused with monkeypox, one does not need to rule them out by laboratory testing
  • In order to be a “confirmed” case, all that is needed is either a suspected or probable case and is laboratory confirmed for monkeypox “virus” by detection of unique sequences of “viral” DNA either by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or sequencing
  • In other words, one only needs to be suspected of having monkeypox in a non-endemic country and does not need other similar diseases to be ruled out by laboratory testing while only needing a positive PCR test for monkeypox to become confirmed
  • The WHO admits that identification of confirmed and suspected cases of monkeypox without any travel history to an endemic area in multiple countries is atypical
  • The WHO also states that due to the range of conditions that cause skin rashes and because clinical presentation may more often be atypical in this outbreak, it can be challenging to differentiate monkeypox solely based on the clinical presentation, particularly for cases with an atypical presentation
  • Laboratory confirmation of monkeypox relies principally on nucleic acid amplification tests, such as PCR, performed on material from the skin lesion
  • Testing of other body fluids and tissues, including oropharyngeal swabs, urine, semen, rectal and/or genital swabs, may be indicated based on the clinical presentation and location of the lesions yet data on the accuracy of testing on these samples is still limited
  • Diagnostic testing for “orthopoxviruses” (which includes monkeypox “virus”) is available at LRN laboratories as there is no commercial assay to detect monkeypox “virus” (i.e. the PCR results are not specific for monkeypox)
  • Antigen and antibody detection methods may not be useful as they do not distinguish between “orthopoxviruses”
  • The Laboratory Response Network — a collection of state, local, veterinary, and military labs tapped to test for biological or chemical threats — perform the initial test to see if the cause is an orthopox “virus”
  • Samples are then sent to CDC to confirm which type
  • The system for “poxviruses” was designed specifically so the CDC would handle any cases of smallpox
  • “In this circumstance, an orthopox diagnosis at the LRN is monkeypox until proven otherwise,” said John Brooks, a CDC medical epidemiologist
  • According to the CDC’s smallpox protocols currently in use for monkeypox, in the absence of known disease (as in a non-endemic country), the predictive value of a positive test diagnosis is low
  • In January 2021, the WHO reminded IVD users that disease prevalence alters the predictive value of test results; as disease prevalence decreases, the risk of false positive increases
  • This means that the probability that a person who has a positive result is truly infected with the “virus” decreases as prevalence decreases, irrespective of the claimed specificity

If we are to believe the official monkeypox narrative, we are currently witnessing the rapid global expansion of a monkeypox “virus” that is said not to be highly contagious and relatively difficult to transmit. We are seeing this “virus” pop up in non-endemic countries that do not regularly see cases of monkeypox and in people with no travel history to endemic areas. We are seeing the symptoms presenting themselves in atypical and irregular ways mimicking many other diseases including STD’s. We are seeing the “virus” almost exclusively attack gay men through a sexual transmission route for which it is not known to spread. The PCR tests for the “virus” are not specific to the monkeypox and are inaccurate when disease prevalence is low, as is currently the case. If one were to look at this monkeypox craze both critically and logically, they would realize that this fear-campaign has the makings of yet another Testing Pandemic. They may have fooled you once before. Now there is no reason for them to be able to do so again.

21 comments

  1. …”While trusting the CDC, the very organization that needs disease outbreaks in order to stay funded and relevant, to accurately and honestly test to confirm anything should be alarming”…yes, pandemic-scared-to-death alarming.

    I guess by never watching the TV news or using the mainstream social media sites, I am missing all the fun. I asked myself some of the same questions…if it doesn’t spread so easily, why is it in 9 countries so quickly and at the same time?

    That speaks volumes for another fake pandemic just in time for the coming elections. Covid was invented to get rid of Trump and I surmise this contrived “pox” thing will accelerate into the fall creating severe disruptions in the election process. And why? Because the democrats are, by most polls, falling farther into the quagmire as their approval ratings can barely beat out “Green Acres” reruns.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I agree. I find it best not to listen to the TV and MSM. It will definitely rot the brain. 😉 I can feel my brain shrinking every time I read one of their articles…

      Like

    2. Hmm, Trump fully enabled the Operation. Starting with the Sept ’19 executive order to facilitate the rapid development of new flu vaccines, then the keeping secret the Fed Reserve’s plan to inject trillions of dollars into the global economy to prevent another 2008-like meltdown, which necessitated an economic shutdown to prevent hyper inflation, a shutdown then facilitated by the lockdown. And then the March ’20 declaration of emergency which enabled the lockdown, mandates,…. And then Operation Warp Speed, fully pushing the jabs in spite of no testing. Democrats and Republicans are both fully complicit. This is a joint operation against the 99.9%, i.e. us. Everywhere in the world.

      Liked by 2 people

    3. IMO Covid was primarily for softening up the unwitting, destroying global demand and masking the repo crisis (with Covid bailouts) that would have metastasized into another Lehman moment. The fake NATO-Russia war is an extension of that. The future is a series of rolling, overlapping manufactured crises until there’s no more manufacturing. Famines look to be Round 3. Monkeypox and other copyrighted diseases may play the role of wingmen so as to control mass migrations.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. We simply have to stop trying to deal with this by thinking. That’s what experts are for. They understand why a disease which is hard to spread is in 9 countries all of a sudden. Trust them. 🙂

    Thanks again, Mike!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thanks for the great info, Mike.

    Nice tidy little closed-door operational policy they have going on this one, with the LNR labs only. Handy dandy.

    I believe you are misreading the situation somewhat but I’m open to being mistaken. As I read it they do in fact claim to PCR test specifically for monkeypox and not just orthopoxes in general. Whether that’s always a staggered, two-step testing process or just sometimes I couldn’t tell.

    By extension, the “monkeypox until proven otherwise” statement is just saying that in order for them to remain vigilant, the SOP will be to assume any orthopox result will require a follow-up composite positive or negative monkeypox diagnosis. That’s perfectly reasonable from their perspective.

    And I have to credit them for admitting that PCR is an imperfect (to put it mildly lol) test insofar as it’s part of a composite diagnosis (triangulation) along with the intensity of the clinical symptoms on the ground. That’s as it should be.

    Still, in toto it’s just another charade.

    Like

    1. There are no commercial assays so the labs only use the non-specific tests for “Orthopoxviruses.” If they are positive, the sample is sent to the CDC. Only the CDC apparently has the “specific” monkeypox tests which, to me, is very suspect:

      “Dozens of public health labs across the country now use a more generalized test for orthopoxvirus, a larger category that includes monkeypox, smallpox and other viruses. Two biotechnology companies, Roche and Abbott, have announced plans to roll out monkeypox PCR tests, although right now, their test kits are for research only.

      The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it’s exploring ways to get monkeypox-specific testing out to states.

      There are already 74 labs across 46 states — part of a network known as the Laboratory Response Network — that are “using an FDA-cleared test for orthopoxviruses,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Thursday.The testing that CDC does is more specific to the monkeypox virus, and the agency can genetically sequence samples, as well. For example, it was by looking at the viral genetic code of the first US patient — a man in Massachusetts who had recently traveled to Canada — that researchers were able to see that his case of monkeypox closely matched that of a case in Portugal.”

      https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/05/30/health/monkeypox-testing-plans-us/index.html

      Like

  4. I forgot to mention this part of your summary:

    “Diagnostic testing for “orthopoxviruses” (which includes monkeypox “virus”) is available at LRN laboratories as there is no commercial assay to detect monkeypox “virus” (i.e. the PCR results are not specific for monkeypox)”

    They’re not saying that there’s no assay (PCR test) at all for monkeypox, they’re just saying that they’re are no consumer versions, either OTC or via commercial labs accessible to the general public. In-network CDC labs only.

    Like

  5. Mike you are on the money. “We can see that this outbreak is unusual in that it is rapidly occurring among people (mostly gay men) in non-endemic countries who have no history of travel to the areas where monkeypox is said to occur. That statement right there should sound the alarm and raise the red flags for everyone.” For those who weren’t born at the time late 70’s & 80’a at the era of the HIV scam , it was the very same tactic used.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly. They like to copy/paste the same formula every time. The complete similarities between these “crises” are striking if anyone is willing to look at the playbook.

      Like

  6. Hi Mike. Thanks for another excellent analysis and summary. Keep up the great work, it’s so much appreciated. While I don’t take issue with any of your conclusions in relation to what is going on with this so-called Monkeypox ‘epidemic’ (particularly the clear reality that this is just another testing scam) I feel there is another dimension to this ‘mania’ that may so far have been overlooked. As you point out the illogicality of all this is plain for all to see: the same ‘disease’ popping up simultaneously around the world, it only being observed in a specific demographic grouping and only when this grouping presents to certain centres – all this would have even Pasteur shaking his head in disbelief.

    “The media wants us to believe that we have unrelated monkeypox cases occurring in non-endemic countries breaking out almost exclusively amongst gay men who were being seen for STD’s and are being diagnosed with a “virus” that is not highly contagious which is not known to spread through sexual activity. That is quite the giant pill of BS to swallow”

    If one is to take at face value that STD clinics are actually observing symptoms in people who are presenting to them and not just relying on the fraudulent PCR tests to make a diagnosis then it is worth asking why are only sexually active gay and bisexual men turning up with these symptoms. Men and women who have heterosexual sex and women who have sex with other women by definition also have close bodily contact with other people. Why have they not been presenting to the same STD clinics with the same symptoms? As you say, the notion that ‘viruses’, were they to exist, are homophobic, sexist and racist is downright preposterous.

    So if men who have sex with other men (MSM) are really presenting simultaneously to STD clinics across the world with unusual rashes is there something else going on? Are there any recent developments relevant to this demographic group that can plausibly explain this phenomenon? One might think initially of the toxic jabs but these were universally administered so can’t in themselves explain symptoms in one grouping only. There is however one significant development in the last few years which only affects this specific grouping: the widespread roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis medication (PrEP), a pill touted as a magic bullet to prevent MSM from acquiring ‘HIV’. Free access to this medication has been made available in a number of European countries since 2020. According to the English National Health Service

    “Since October 2020, the NHS in England has prescribed PrEP to more than 26,000 people most of whom are gay and bisexual men via specialist sexual health services.
    Those people who are taking PrEP must also be supported to get regular HIV testing and STI screening every three months.’

    Truvada is one of the main pills prescribed as a PrEP. According to Stanford Healthcare and other medical sites common ‘side effects’ of Truvada are: headache, nausea, vomiting, rash and a loss of appetite. Others include depression, dizziness, difficulty sleeping, low energy and diarrhea. Clearly enough there to meet a WHO Monkeypox diagnosis. So if I am a gay man taking Truvada and I’m required to present regularly to my local STD clinic and I subsequently present with unusual rash symptoms does the clinic first rule out the PrEP as possible cause? Or does it go straight to PCR Monkeypox testing? Is it likely the clinic would even admit that its prescribed medication was the probable cause of its patient’s illness? I wonder. On top of all this, I don’t think it is any coincidence that people who are actively taking PrEP in the UK are the ones who are being targeted for Monkeypox testing/vaccination.

    It would seem that HIV is the gift that keeps on giving for the pharmaceutical industry. Terrify a population with a mythical illness and impose widespread restrictions on the people’s lifestyle as a result,, then tell them these restrictions can be removed if they take a medical intervention. Then blame any harmful effects of said intervention on a separate cause that Big Pharma just happens to have another medical cure for.waiting in the wings. Sound familiar?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Agreed. Many of these monkeypox cases may simply be the result of toxins exiting the body due to prophylactic use of medications. There are other factors of course such as increased testing in a testing prone population as well as a reclassification of genital herpes symptoms as monkeypox. Also, the symptoms called monkeypox currently are atypical of the disease so technically a pimple can be considered monkeypox and require testing as has been shown in cases.

      In other words, while I agree some of these cases are potentially due to the drugs, I’m not positive there is an increase of specific symptoms currently in the gay population. There is an increase in fear and in the awareness of any potential “monkeypox” symptom in a population that is willing to be tested with fraudulent tests which can create the appearance of an outbreak even when there is none. In fact, many pegged as MP cases originally were being tested for other issues in STD clinics. I think, as with “Covid,” this is most likely a creation stemming from fear-based propaganda mixed with fraudulent testing rather than a rash outbreak of disease in a specific population.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Again, I dispute nothing of what you say and I too doubt that there has been any increase of disease symptoms in the gay population. I was just trying to grapple with the sheer illogicality of it all. At least the Convid story attempted to stick to the internal logic of germ theory. Perhaps in the roll-out of a new wonder drug to a general population they had their cover story prepped (pun intended) in case people started getting ill – and they went ahead with the fear story anyway despite it making no sense whatsoever. After all they’ve got to flog those jabs somehow. Thanks again for the great work you do.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. No worries! I didn’t take it as you disputing what I said nor would I be upset if you did. I enjoy conversation no matter where one comes from. I think the points you raise are definitely valid and are contributing factors to this “outbreak” for sure. Thanks for the input and the support! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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