The Infectious Myth Busted Part 1: The Rosenau Spanish Flu Experiments (1918)

Here is something you will never see in the mainstream news. During the 1918 Spanish Flu, which is considered to be the most contagious “virus” of all time, researchers for the Public Health Service and the U.S. Navy tried to determine what caused the flu and how infectious it truly was. However, the results of their experiments proved that the flu is not infectious at all. Here is a brief overview of what took place during the studies:

The State of Science, Microbiology, and Vaccines Circa 1918

“Perhaps the most interesting epidemiological studies conducted during the 1918–1919 pandemic were the human experiments conducted by the Public Health Service and the U.S. Navy under the supervision of Milton Rosenau on Gallops Island, the quarantine station in Boston Harbor, and on Angel Island, its counterpart in San Francisco. The experiment began with 100 volunteers from the Navy who had no history of influenza. Rosenau was the first to report on the experiments conducted at Gallops Island in November and December 1918.69 His first volunteers received first one strain and then several strains of Pfeiffer’s bacillus by spray and swab into their noses and throats and then into their eyes. When that procedure failed to produce disease, others were inoculated with mixtures of other organisms isolated from the throats and noses of influenza patients. Next, some volunteers received injections of blood from influenza patients. Finally, 13 of the volunteers were taken into an influenza ward and exposed to 10 influenza patients each. Each volunteer was to shake hands with each patient, to talk with him at close range, and to permit him to cough directly into his face. None of the volunteers in these experiments developed influenza. Rosenau was clearly puzzled, and he cautioned against drawing conclusions from negative results. He ended his article in JAMA with a telling acknowledgement: “We entered the outbreak with a notion that we knew the cause of the disease, and were quite sure we knew how it was transmitted from person to person. Perhaps, if we have learned anything, it is that we are not quite sure what we know about the disease.”69 (p. 313)

The research conducted at Angel Island and that continued in early 1919 in Boston broadened this research by inoculating with the Mathers streptococcus and by including a search for filter-passing agents, but it produced similar negative results.7072 It seemed that what was acknowledged to be one of the most contagious of communicable diseases could not be transferred under experimental conditions.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2862332/#!po=60.7527

The studies at Gallops and Angel Island, taking place on separate coasts at different times, showed that no matter how hard the researchers tried, they could not transmit the “deadly” Spanish flu from sick to healthy humans. They worked very hard to infect the volunteers in numerous ways and attempted to account for any factors which may have potentially interfered with transmission. Alas, they were entirely unsuccessful in transmitting the “virus” in every single case.

Milton Rosenau

For a more in depth look at what occurred on Gallops Island, I have provided Milton Rosenau’s full report with a summary at the end:

EXPERIMENTS TO DETERMINE MODE OF SPREAD OF INFLUENZA MILTON J. ROSENAU, M.D. BOSTON

“The experiments here described were performed on an island in Boston Harbor, on volunteers obtained from the Navy. The work was conducted by a group of officers detailed for that purpose, from the U. S. Navy and the U. S. Public Health Service, consisting of Dr. G. W. McCoy, director of the Hygienic Library, Dr. Joseph Goldberger, Dr. Leake, and Dr. Lake, all on the part of the U. S. Public Health Service; and cooperating with those medical officers, was a group also detailed for this purpose on the part of the U. S. Navy, consisting of Dr. J. J. Keegan, Dr. De Wayne Richey and myself.

The work itself was conducted at Gallops Island, which is the quarantine station of the Port of Boston, and peculiarly well fitted for operations of this kind, serving adequately for the purposes of isolation, observations, and maintenance of the large group of
volunteers and personnel necessary to take care of them.

The volunteers were all of the most susceptible age, mostly between 18 and 25, only a few of them around 30 years old; and all were in good physical condition. None of these volunteers, 100 all told in number, had “influenza;” that is, from the most careful histories that we could elicit, they gave no account of a febrile attack of any kind during the winter, except a few who were purposely selected, as having shown a typical attack of influenza, in order to test questions of immunity, and for the purpose of control.

Now, we proceeded rather cautiously at first by administering a pure culture of bacillus of influenza, Pfeiffer’s bacillus, in a rather moderate amount, into the nostrils of a few of these volunteers. These early experiments I will not stop to relate, but I will go at once to what I may call our Experiment 1.

EXPERIMENTS AT GALLOPS ISLAND

As the preliminary trials proved negative, we became bolder, and selecting nineteen of our volunteers, gave each one of them a very large quantity of a mixture of thirteen different strains of the Pfeiffer bacillus, some of them obtained recently from the lungs at necropsy; others were subcultures of varying age, and each of the thirteen had, of course, a different history. Suspensions of these organisms were sprayed with an atomizer into the nose and into the eyes, and back into the throat, while the volunteers were breathing in. We used some billions of these organisms, according to our estimated counts, on each one of the volunteers, but none of them took sick.

Then we proceeded to transfer the virus obtained from cases of the disease; that is, we collected the material and mucous secretions of the mouth and nose and throat and bronchi from cases of the disease and transferred this to our volunteers. We always obtained this material in the same way: The patient with fever, in bed, has a large, shallow, traylike arrangement before him or her, and we washed out one nostril with some sterile salt solution, using perhaps 5 ce., which is allowed to run into this tray; and that nostril is blown vigorously into the tray. This is repeated with the other nostril. The patient then gargles with some of the solution. Next we obtain some bronchial mucus through coughing, and then we swab the mucous surface of each nares and also the mucous membrane of the throat. We place these swabs with the material in a bottle with glass beads, and add all the material obtained in the tray. This is the stuff we transfer to our volunteers. In this particular experiment, in which we used ten volunteers, each of them received a comparatively small quantity of this, about 1 c.c. sprayed into each nostril and into the throat, while inspiring, and on the eye. None of these took sick. Some of the same material was filtered and instilled into other volunteers but produced no results.

Now, I may mention at this point that the donors were all patients with influenza iti Boston hospitals; sometimes at the U. S. Naval Hospital at Chelsea, sometimes at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, where we had access to suitable cases. We always kept in mind the fact that we have no criterion of influenza; therefore I would like to emphasize the fact that we never took an isolated case of fever, but selected our donors from a distinct focus or outbreak of the disease, sometimes an epidemic in a school with 100 cases, from which we would select four or five typical cases, in order to prevent mistakes in diagnosis of influenza.

Now, thinking that perhaps the failure to reproduce the disease in the experiments that I have described
was due to the fact that we obtained the material in the hospitals in Boston, and then took it down the bay to Gallops Island, which sometimes required four
hours before our volunteers received the material, and believing that the virus was perhaps very frail, and could not stand this exposure, we planned another experiment, in which we obtained a large amount of material, and by special arrangements, rushed it down to Gallops Island; so that the interval between taking the material from the donors and giving it to our volunteers was only one hour and forty minutes, all told. Each one of these volunteers in this experiment, ten in number, received 6 c.c. of the mixed stuff that I have described. They received it into each nostril; received it in the throat, and on the eye; and when you think that 6 c.c. in all was used, you will understand that some of it was swallowed. None of them took sick.

Then, thinking perhaps it was not only the time that was causing our failures, but also the salt solution—for it is possible that the salt solution might be inimical to the virus—-we planned another experiment to eliminate both the time factor and the salt solution, and all other outside influences. In this experiment we had little cotton swabs on the end of sticks, and we transferred the material directly from nose to nose and from throat to throat, using a West tube for the throat culture, so as to get the material not only from the tonsils, but also from the posterior nasopharynx.

We used nineteen volunteers for this experiment, and it was during the time of the outbreak, when we had a choice of many donors. A few of the donors were in the first day of the disease. Others were in the second or third day of the disease. None of these volunteers who received the material thus directly transferred from cases took sick in any way. When I say none of them took sick in any way, I mean that after receiving the material they were then isolated on Gallops Island. Their temperature was taken three times a day and carefully examined, of course, and under constant medical supervision they were held for one full week before they were released, and perhaps used again for some other experiment. All of the volunteers received at least two, and some of them three “shots” as they expressed it.

Our next experiment consisted in injections of blood. We took five donors, five cases of influenza in the febrile stage, some of them again quite early in the disease. We drew 20 ‘c.c. from the arm vein of each, making a total of 100 c.c, which was mixed and treated with 1 per cent, of sodium citrate. Ten c.c. of the citrated whole blood were injected into each of the ten volunteers. None of them took sick in any way. Then we collected a lot of mucous material from the upper respiratory tract, and filtered it through Mandler filters. While these filters will hold back the bacteria of ordinary size, they will allow “ultramicroscopic” organisms to pass. This filtrate was injected into ten volunteers, each one receiving 3.5 c.c. subcutaneously, and none of these took sick in any way.

The next experiment was designed to imitate the natural way in which influenza spreads, at least the
way in which we believe influenza spreads, and I have no doubt it does—by human contact. This experiment consisted in bringing ten of our volunteers from Gallops Island to the U.S. Naval Hospital at Chelsea, into a ward having thirty beds, all filled with influenza.

We had previously selected ten of these patients to be the donors; and now, if you will follow me with one of our volunteers in this ward, and remember that the other nine were at the same time doing the same thing, we shall have a picture of just what was happening in this experiment:

The volunteer was led up to the bedside of the patient; he was introduced. He sat down alongside the bed of the patient. They shook hands, and. by instructions, he got as close as he conveniently could, and they talked· for live minutes. At the end of the five minutes, the patient breathed out as hard as he could, while the volunteer, muzzle to muzzle (in accordance with his instructions, about 2 inches between the two), received this expired -breath, and at the same time was
breathing in as the patient breathed out. This they repeated five times, and they did it fairly faithfully in almost all of the instances.

After they had done this for five times, the patient coughed directly into the face of the volunteer, face to face, five différent times.

I may say that the volunteers were perfectly splendid about carrying out the technic of these experiments. They did it with a high idealism. They were inspired with the thought that they might help others. They went through the program in a splendid spirit. After our volunteer had had this sort of contact with the patient, talking and chatting and shaking hands with him for five minutes, and receiving his breath five times, and then his cough five times directly in his face, he moved to the next patient whom we had selected, and repeated this, and so on, until this volunteer had had that sort of contact with ten different cases of influenza, in different stages of the disease, mostly fresh cases, none of them more than three days old.

We will remember that each one of the ten volunteers had that sort of intimate contact with each one of the ten different influenza patients. They were watched carefully for seven days—and none of them took sick in any way.

EXPERIMENTS AT PORTSMOUTH

At that point, the holidays came, our material was exhausted, and we temporarily suspended our work.
In fact, we felt rather surprised and somewhat perplexed, and were not sure as to the next way to turn, and we felt it would be better to take a little breathing spell and a rest.

We started another set of experiments in February that lasted into March, again using fifty volunteers carefully selected from the Deer Island Naval Training Station. These experiments I will not give in detail. They would take too long. They were simply designed and the program was carefully planned, but the way matters turned out became very confusing and perplexing. I will give two instances to explain what I mean by that; and I give them because they are exceedingly instructive and very interesting.

In February and March, the epidemic was on the wane. We had difficulty in finding donors. We were not sure of our diagnosis, having no criterion of influenza. We therefore felt very fortunate when we learned of an outbreak that was taking place at the
Portsmouth Naval Prison, only a few hours north of Boston. We at once loaded a couple of automobiles filled with our volunteers, and rushed up to Portsmouth, and there repeated many things that I have described in our first set of experiments. At Portsmouth, typical cases for donors, and transferring the material directly to our volunteers. In about thirty-six hours, half of the number we exposed came down with fever and sore throat, with hemolytic streptococci present, and doubtless as the causal agent. All the clinicians who saw these cases in consultation agreed with us that they were ordinary cases of sore throat.

Another incident : One of our officers, Dr. L., who had been in intimate contact with the disease from
early in October, collected material from six healthy men at the Portsmouth Navy Yard who were thought might be in the period of incubation of the disease—we were trying to get material as early as possible, because all the evidence seems to indicate that the infection is transmittable early in the disease. None of the six men came down with influenza, but Dr. L. came down in thirty-six hours, with a clinical attack of influenza, although he had escaped all the rest of the outbreak.

CONCLUSION

I think we must be very careful not to draw any positive conclusions from negative results of this kind. Many factors must be considered. Our volunteers may not have been susceptible. They may have been immune. They had been exposed as all the rest of the people had been exposed to the disease, although they gave no clinical history of an attack.

Dr. McCoy, who with Dr. Richey, did a similar series of experiments on Goat Island, San Francisco, used volunteers who, so far as known, had not been exposed to the outbreak at all, also had negative results, that is, they were unable to reproduce the disease. Perhaps there are factors, or a factor, in the transmission of influenza that we do not know.

As a matter of fact, we entered the outbreak with a notion that we knew the cause of the disease, and were quite sure we knew how it was transmitted from person to person. Perhaps, if we have learned anything, it is that we are not quite sure what we know about the disease.

https://zenodo.org/record/1505669/files/article.pdf?download=1

ViroLIEgy 101: Take the same symptoms of disease and give it a new name.

In Summary:

  • None of these volunteers, 100 in all, had “influenza;” except for a few who were purposely selected in order to test questions of immunity, and for the purpose of control
  • Preliminary experiments using a pure culture of Pfeiffer’s bacillus, in a rather moderate amount sprayed into the nostrils of a few of the volunteers, failed to produce results
  • Nineteen of the volunteers were given a very large quantity of a mixture of thirteen different strains of the Pfeiffer bacillus
  • Suspensions of these organisms were sprayed with an atomizer into the nose and into the eyes, and back into the throat, while the volunteers were breathing in
  • According to their estimates, they used some billions of these organisms on each one of the volunteers, but none of them became sick
  • They collected the material and mucous secretions of the mouth and nose and throat and bronchi from cases of the disease and transferred this to volunteers
  • In this particular experiment with ten volunteers, each received a comparatively small quantity of mucus secretions, about 1 c.c. sprayed into each nostril and into the throat, while inspiring, and on the eye
  • None of these 10 volunteers became sick and some of the same material was filtered and instilled into other volunteers but produced no results
  • They had no criterion of influenza but selected donors from a distinct focus or outbreak of the disease, sometimes an epidemic in a school with 100 cases, from which they would select four or five typical cases in order to prevent mistakes in diagnosis of influenza
  • Fearing that the 4 hour time from sample collection to use may have interfered with transmission, samples were collected and used within 1.5 hours
  • Each one of the 10 volunteers in this experiment received 6 c.c. of the mixed stuff previously described
  • They received it into each nostril; received it in the throat, and some of it was swallowed yet none of the volunteers became sick
  • Fearing the salt solution in the mixture next, they eliminated it as a variable as well as all other outside influences
  • In this next experiment they had little cotton swabs on the end of sticks, and transferred the material directly from nose to nose and from throat to throat, using a West tube for the throat culture, so as to get the material not only from the tonsils, but also from the posterior nasopharynx
  • Nineteen volunteers were used and none became sick in any way
  • When Rosenau says none became sick in any way, he carefully lays out that:
    1. After receiving the material, the volunteers were then isolated on Gallops Island
    2. Their temperature was taken three times a day and they were carefully examined
    3. They were under constant medical supervision and were held for one full week before they were released
    4. Some were used again for other experiments
    5. All of the volunteers received at least two, and some of them three “shots” as they expressed it
  • The next experiment consisted of injections of blood
  • They took five donors, five cases of influenza quite early in the disease, and drew 20 c.c. from the arm vein of each, making a total of 100 c.c, which was mixed and treated with 1 percent, of sodium citrate
  • Ten c.c. of the citrated whole blood were injected into each of the ten volunteers and none of them became sick in any way
  • Mucous material from the upper respiratory tract was collected and filtered
  • This filtrate was injected into ten volunteers, each one receiving 3.5 c.c. subcutaneously, and none of the volunteers became sick in any way
  • The next experiment was designed to imitate the natural way in which influenza spreads through human contact
  • This was the process as described by Rosenau:
    1. The volunteer was led up to the bedside of the patient
    2. He was introduced and sat down alongside the bed of the patient
    3. They shook hands, and by instructions, he got as close as he conveniently could, and they talked for five minutes
    4. At the end of the five minutes, the patient breathed out as hard as he could, while the volunteer, muzzle to muzzle (in accordance with his instructions, about 2 inches between the two), received this expired breath, and at the same time was breathing in as the patient breathed out
    5. They repeated this five times, and they did it fairly faithfully in almost all of the instances
    6. After they had done this for five times, the patient coughed directly into the face of the volunteer, face to face, five différent times
    7. The volunteer then proceeded to 9 other patients in varying stages of illness and the process outlined above was repeated in its entirety with each one
  • All ten volunteers who spent time with all ten patients were watched carefully for seven days—and none of them became sick in any way
  • After undertaking the various experiments described above and the negative results obtained, Rosenau admits they felt rather surprised and somewhat perplexed, and was not sure as to the next way to turn
  • In further experiments, after about thirty-six hours after inoculation, half of the number they exposed came down with fever and sore throat, with hemolytic streptococci present, which was considered doubtless as the causal agent
  • All the clinicians who saw these cases in consultation agreed with the researchers that these were ordinary cases of sore throat
  • One Dr., who collected material from 6 healthy men believed to be in the early stages of influenza, became ill with influenza himself while the 6 men remained healthy
  • Dr. McCoy, who with Dr. Richey, did a similar series of experiments on Goat Island, San Francisco, used volunteers who had not been exposed to the outbreak at all and also had negative results and were unable to reproduce the disease
  • Rosenau’s final conclusion:
    • “As a matter of fact, we entered the outbreak with a notion that we knew the cause of the disease, and were quite sure we knew how it was transmitted from person to person. Perhaps, if we have learned anything, it is that we are not quite sure what we know about the disease.

Rosenau’s experiments were just one of many which attempted and failed to transmit a “virus” to humans in both “natural” and experimental ways. As stated previously, further experiments were conducted on the East coast on Angel Island which also produced negative results. There are many other studies throughout the early 20th century which came to the same conclusions. One of these is detailed by this abstract coming from a study from 1921:

Influenza Studies III. Attempts to Cultivate Filtrable Viruses from Cases of Influenza and Common Colds

Sara E Branham, Ivan C Hall

The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 143-149, 1921

These experiments offer no evidence in support of the theory that the cause of either common colds or influenza is a filtrable virus. In attempting to cultivate filtrable viruses from the nasopharyngeal secretions in colds and influenza, no bodies were found in the “cultures” which could not be found also in those from normal persons, in controls in all simple mediums examined, and on blank slides. It is recognized that negative experiments, limited to the attempted cultivation of a filtrable virus, and including no attempts to reproduce the disease in animals, do not offer conclusive evidence that such a virus is not involved. No conclusions can be drawn concerning influenza, on account of the few cases examined, together with the fact that samples of such were not collected during the earliest stages of the disease. However, the uniformly negative results obtained with a large and representative number of colds are not without significance.”

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cluster=15073126220601141127&hl=en&as_sdt=0,28#d=gs_qabs&u=%23p%3Dh6eO0W-ALtEJ

There is plenty of evidence against the myth of infectiousness. Researchers have repeatedly tried and failed to transmit invisible “viruses” from human-to-human. It is because of these early failed experiments negating the myth of human-to-human transmission of disease that these kinds of studies with human subjects were deemed unethical and were ultimately stopped. Instead, the evidence for “viruses” came from experimentally created disease through unnatural injections of ground up animal tissues mixed with toxic chemicals/additives into the brains, eyes, nose, throats, veins, etc. of other animals. Since virology could not show human-to-human transmission of disease, they decided to trick the gullible and the ignorant by creating experimental disease through the torture of animals. Obviously the much more “ethical” path.

6 comments

  1. My second “Ah ha!” moment back in early 2020 was reading about Rosenau’s experiment in the book, The Invisible Rainbow. I have referenced it many times. The first “Ah ha!” moment was seveeral weeks earlier when I read David Crowe’s paper on PCR. I knew then this truly was an infectious myth, it was all fraud.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, I remember hearing Dr. Cowan speak of this in his first video but I had never read about it. It took me a while to track it down info on the Gallops/Angel Island experiments back then, but when I did, it was mind-blowing to me. I updated the post this time to include the full paper which is the first time I actually read the whole thing. It’s even more mind-blowing to me now. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have listened to many explain that a virus has never been isolated. It’s pretty easy to understand this. It’s equally easy to understand how EMF’s disrupt our bodies.

    What has not been easy is connecting the dots. I want to understand how people get sick when exposed to a sick person. One example…. It happens all the time when I take care of sick grandbaies. Also, for example, if 5G amped up is causing flare ups of sickness (named covid), it seems like a whole neighborhood would be affected at the same time, or at least nearby neighbors. This has not been the case. Some close neighbors went through the sickness months after us. Then, not everyone in our household got sick. Maybe the ones who got sick all went to the same place within the same time frame, where 5G was stronger?? So if a family member did not go where I did, maybe they were not affected? Also, if it makes us sick, why does it not still continue to make us sick in a similar way?

    I am so confused on those points. I have so many questions. Everything I read and books I have bought only explain the virus has never been isolated. I believe that. I have not found any answers to the questions above. I can anyone point me in the right direction?

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    1. There are numerous factors that influence whether someone gets sick or not. To me, the biggest factor in respiratory disease is air pollution which has seen levels rise greatly the last four years. PM2.5 exposure produces all of the same symptoms of disease as “Covid-19.” Now, while I believe air pollution is a huge factor, it is not the only factor. Toxic non-organic foods, fluoridated/chlorinated water, poisonous pharmaceuticals/vaccines, drugs/alchohol use, too much stress, lack of sleep/exercise, environmental radiation, etc. all play a role in acquiring disease. The problem occurs when people start looking for one cause. There is no one cause and cases/statistics are manipulated by faulty/inaccurate PCR tests. There is no new disease caused by one thing. It is the same symptoms of disease caused by numerous factors.

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      1. Thank you. I am aware of all the environmental toxins causing sickness. I’m struggling to understand that if sickness is only coming from within, why when I start to get a sore throat, can I gargle with silver or nebulize with peroxide, it then clears up. I haven’t cleared up the terrain of my fluids around and in cells, yet a topical treatment knocks it out. If I am not able to to do one of these, , I end up sick. If it’s not something infecting, then why will a household all get the same cold back to back or close to the same time if each persons terrain is different? Or I go to my grandbabies to take care of them and a few days later end up with the same cold. Or, at a day care most of the children break out with the same cold or symptoms (they all come from different homes, different environments, and have taken in different things into their bodies, so why do they all get the same thing at the same time). Or how does an antibiotic clear an infection when it’s just the cells sick from the terrain? I really want to understand but must be missing something because it is very confusing for me.

        Like

      2. While antibiotics and other medications may clear up symptoms, they may not clear up any underlying issues causing disease. Many times, people take medications which may clear up their current illness but some time later they may come down with something worse. As for why people may get sick around the same time, most likely it is environmental. There are myths of Chickenpox and measles parties but I can not find solid information on them. I have found plenty of evidence showing it is difficult (if not impossible) to transfer chickenpox/shingles to humans and animals. I’ve heard a theory that when one person detoxes it may signal another person to go through a similar detox but again, I’ve seen no solid evidence for this, just theories. IMO, if people are all in the same place and come down with similar symptoms, it’s most likely food poisoning and/or environmental factors such as air pollution.

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